Gonjasufi – Mu.zz.le
       It may be crackly, hoarse, even ugly, but there is a special magic to Gonjasufi’s voice and music. It is reported that Gonjasufi came upon an enlightenment of sorts when he finished the grueling process of becoming a yoga master. Along the way, he found one of the most original voices in modern music, no question. It is high pitched and nearly inhuman, demonic. His unique voice makes him a great spokesperson for new movements in experimental music. On Mu.zz.le, Gonjasufi establishes himself as the Portishead of our day, innovating on the already inventive world of trip hop. He certainly shares their affinity for the disturbing, as evidenced by the screams of a girl on the tragically epic “Nikels and Dimes.” The Portishead similarity is cemented on the genius “Feedin Birds.” The guest vocals on this track are very reminiscent of Beth Gibbons. Even Gonjasufi’s vocals share a root with hers, there’s has always been a crackling rawness to both their voices. “Feedin Birds” is also lyrically brilliant, painting the empty cycle of earning money. Portishead’s playfulness with mixing a song makes a grand return on “Rubberband,” where the main track abruptly snaps away like a… rubberband, leaving only his stirring vocals behind. And “The Blame” almost sounds like Black Eyed Peas’ “Where is the Love” if you tied it to a rusted Cadillac and dragged it through gravel. On Mu.zz.le Gonjasufi takes trippiness to a new modern level and makes a great follow-up to A Sufi and a Killer, possibly even overshadowing it. 

Gonjasufi – Mu.zz.le

       It may be crackly, hoarse, even ugly, but there is a special magic to Gonjasufi’s voice and music. It is reported that Gonjasufi came upon an enlightenment of sorts when he finished the grueling process of becoming a yoga master. Along the way, he found one of the most original voices in modern music, no question. It is high pitched and nearly inhuman, demonic. His unique voice makes him a great spokesperson for new movements in experimental music. On Mu.zz.le, Gonjasufi establishes himself as the Portishead of our day, innovating on the already inventive world of trip hop. He certainly shares their affinity for the disturbing, as evidenced by the screams of a girl on the tragically epic “Nikels and Dimes.” The Portishead similarity is cemented on the genius “Feedin Birds.” The guest vocals on this track are very reminiscent of Beth Gibbons. Even Gonjasufi’s vocals share a root with hers, there’s has always been a crackling rawness to both their voices. “Feedin Birds” is also lyrically brilliant, painting the empty cycle of earning money. Portishead’s playfulness with mixing a song makes a grand return on “Rubberband,” where the main track abruptly snaps away like a… rubberband, leaving only his stirring vocals behind. And “The Blame” almost sounds like Black Eyed Peas’ “Where is the Love” if you tied it to a rusted Cadillac and dragged it through gravel. On Mu.zz.le Gonjasufi takes trippiness to a new modern level and makes a great follow-up to A Sufi and a Killer, possibly even overshadowing it.